Trigeminal neuralgia

Trigeminal neuralgia consists in the appearance of lancinating episodes of pain in the face that can affect any of the three branches of the trigeminal nerve. The pain episodes can be triggered spontaneously, with tactile stimuli (eating, chewing, brushing teeth) or with cold or heat. The pain intensity is usually very high.

 

Microvascular decompression of the trigeminal nerve root and percutaneous compression of the trigeminal ganglion (Gasser’s ganglion) are very effective techniques to control the pain episodes.

 

In a significant number of patients, the cause of the facial pain is the compression of the trigeminal nerve root by the superior cerebellar artery. The microvascular decompression technique (Janetta technique) performed through a retromastoid craniotomy, is usually very effective.

 

Alternatively, percutaneous balloon compression of the trigeminal ganglion through a puncture in the face on the affected side, also reduces the pain episodes by generating anesthesia of the skin in the affected area ( Mullan’s technique).

Treatments:

 

Percutaneous compression of the Gasserian ganglion (Mullan’s technique) for trigeminal neuralgia

Percutaneous radiofrequency thermocoagulation of the Gasserian ganglion for trigeminal neuralgia

Microvascular decompression of the trigeminal nerve (trigeminal neuralgia)

Cortical stimulation therapy for chronic pain

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